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How Often Do You Tell Lies?1246

Belew private msg quote post Address this user
I have a good friend.

He tells lies. I know ... because he told me. I just don't know if he tells them to me.

Are marketers inherently liars? Truth stretchers? Fibbers? Does it come with the territory?

Mark Twain shared his thoughts on telling the truth - "If you always tell the truth you don't have to remember what you say."

I read an article earlier today that 60% of people you talk to on any given day will lie to you.

Yeesh! That's more than every other person!

Do you tell lies?


Post 1 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
If you did tell me you told lies, how would I know if I should believe you?
Post 2 • IP   flag post
morrnel private msg quote post Address this user
Answer@rev on a thread about two or three weeks ago
Post 3 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@morrnel

That doesn't help. What thread? Where? Link?
Post 4 • IP   flag post
morrnel private msg quote post Address this user
Here's the question:
Two brothers, one always tells the truth and other always tells lies. What one question can you ask them to figure out the liar is?
Post 5 • IP   flag post
Rev private msg quote post Address this user
Ask either one, "What would your brother tell me is the way I should go?"

Then go the other way.

But to answer @Belew's question, NEVER lie. But always use the truth to your advantage!
Post 6 • IP   flag post
Steve private msg quote post Address this user
Never tell lies, just answer the questions you want to answer and not necessarily the ones you are asked.
Post 7 • IP   flag post
morrnel private msg quote post Address this user
#Rev, The way I heard it was to ask either if he was a human. The liar would answer no and one telling the truth would answer yes.
Post 8 • IP   flag post
morrnel private msg quote post Address this user
The guy came up with the statistic lied.
Post 9 • IP   flag post
Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@morrnel

That must have been a humanities professor who claimed the story for his own use.

The story, as I heard it, was about coming to a branch in the path and needing to know which way to go. Having only one question in order to determine it, knowing who would admit to being human wouldn't be very helpful other than determining which brother would tell the truth -- one question too late. Often the way with humanities.

In my case it was a philosophy prof trying to get our heads around logic, as a precursor to Aristotle I suspect.
Post 10 • IP   flag post
morrnel private msg quote post Address this user
@Rev,
If the liar was not a liar, he would admit to being human and answer yes. But because he is a liar he is forced to lie and answer no to the question. The other person knowing he is human would say yes because he must tell the truth. Pretty obvious logic, I would say. I know who to believe.

The beauty of modernism is you can make up any answer and it's true.
Post 11 • IP   flag post
lunar_ranger private msg quote post Address this user
Marketers explore many human dimensions of business, and conform their reality to suit and perpetuate their own interests and values. They explore this truth, experience will either reinforce it or direct them to take another direction. Subjective truth will always be shaky. The interpretation of market data collected and conclusions drawn are often framed by self-reinforcing standards which are always subject to change and evolve.

I lie, all honest people admit it.
Post 12 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Too often our data will say what we want it to say.
Post 13 • IP   flag post
Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@morrnel

Perhaps you are missing the point. The exercise is to logically determine which path to take by asking only a single question. While, undoubtedly, the "Are you human?" question determines who is, and who is not, the liar, the determination is one question too late and your are no farther along with your "which path?" choice.

Or perhaps I am missing something.
Post 14 • IP   flag post
Rev private msg quote post Address this user
"subjective truth" -- classic oxymoron.
Post 15 • IP   flag post
Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew

...and if it doesn't, discard the outliers, average the clusters, shift the curve, and skew anything that doesn't comply. Then use the results to feed generations on the "truth" that fat is bad for you and high-fructose corn syrup is an acceptable substitute for the loss in flavor.
Post 16 • IP   flag post
morrnel private msg quote post Address this user
@Rev,

The idea was simply to determine who you could or could not trust. No professor involved here. Just a fun thing. We are solving different problems.

My brain hurts now.
Post 17 • IP   flag post
lunar_ranger private msg quote post Address this user
@Rev Truth is always relative and framed by the subject- therefore subjective. Facts in themselves are not... but the understanding of them is filtered through the human experience (empirical data and later reasoning, is only as good as the person interpreting it).
Post 18 • IP   flag post
lunar_ranger private msg quote post Address this user
@morrnel My brain always hurts.
Post 19 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@lunar_ranger I wish I had a brain.
Post 20 • IP   flag post
lunar_ranger private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew Everyone takes a different journey to "see the wizard". If you don't have a brain- than I am a rock.
Post 21 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@lunar_ranger

I should have quoted the Tin Man.

If I only had a brain.

Missed chance.
Post 22 • IP   flag post
Rev private msg quote post Address this user
And should you ever need to see the wizard, I'm here! All roads lead to Kansas. And WizardsPlace.
Post 23 • IP   flag post
27629 23 23
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