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Blogging Daily vs. Promoting Blog Posts?1396

Lenderman33 private msg quote post Address this user
Hi Folks,

Bill Belew has said that time spent posting new content is more effective than promoting recently published content. That is - One is encouraged to post content rather than spend time promoting content. Take a look at this person's alternative view, which encourages content promotion here. From your experience, has this been true?

Some people say that promotion is a critical aspect of the process.

Your experiences?

Thanks!

Erik
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@Lenderman33

I have a case study that addresses this.

I guess I need to see what the other guy says.
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Lenderman33 private msg quote post Address this user
Hi @Belew,

Could you send a link to that case-study, so that I can add that to the post? I looked . . .

Thanks!

Erik
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@Lenderman33

I haven't written it up. I do it live. I guess I need to.

I started to read that link you referenced and realized it was going to take longer to slog thru than my daughter's one hour dance class.

I book marked it so I cannot read it later.

Did anyone ever say too long is too long?

Why not deliver the salient points up front and then allow the reader to go deeper if they desire?

Why make something long just to meet a word count?
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Lenderman33 private msg quote post Address this user
Hi @Belew,

That is an excellent perspective: Summarize answers at the top, and go into detail further down. This brings up another question regarding a new Google feature designed to deliver information to users in such a way as to reduce their need to enter websites. Google simply extracts the answer to the user's question from relevant content, and Google serves the answer to the user in the #1 position. No click-through required.

"Google Answers" to reduce efficacy of content marketing long-term? Perhaps for brief inquiries. This may actually enhance the value of long-form content for those who want to research their subject of interest more deeply than Google Answers. We shall see . . .

Thanks!

Erik
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jycmba private msg quote post Address this user
Seems like the "what you say it" vs "how you say it" argument - BOTH matter.. you can create great content, but unless your intended audience finds it / knows where it is, then you're missing out.

That's why sites like Huffington Post, Entrepreneur magazine, etc. matter.

Sure, if you're getting top results on Google, that can trump some of these. But I'd bet that it's a lot harder for most worthwhile (read high value) niches without getting love from these sites..
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Lenderman33 private msg quote post Address this user
Hi @Jycmba - Great perspective. Thank you for sharing!

What are your thoughts on the "Google Answers" post that appears immediately prior to your post here?

Erik
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Steve private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew Why not deliver the salient points up front and then allow the reader to go deeper if they desire?


This is a style of writing that newspapers use, I can't remember the name but it basically means your best points are at the top ... it was designed so that newspaper editors can cut stories from the bottom up, as new news stories come in.

Given the way people read online, it doesn't quite work however ... think Hubspot and others did tests of this.
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jycmba private msg quote post Address this user
@Lenderman33 - hard to read but I get the gist, I think.. in general seems like someone who's not interested in looking further wasn't your audience anyway..

And it really goes back to having content that your intended audience wants to read more.
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Once you have findability, the style changes.

If you have a ready and waiting readership (Hubspot, Hufpost) and so on, the style changes.

First you have to establish yourself as someone worth being found and followed. There is no short cut to this.
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Steve private msg quote post Address this user
The writing style is called the inverted pyramid ... and its basically as @belew says ... posting the most important things at the top ... and lesser items lower down.

Trouble is, it doesn't work online... as people tend to scan and read what interests them ... not necessarily items at the top of a page...

Link to HubSpot report... on why it doesn't work for business blogs.
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KitK private msg quote post Address this user
Bill, I would love to see that case study!
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Hubs pot writer's conclusion is flawed.

She cannot conclude that the inverted style is no good because people don't read that way. She can conclude that people read that way because most people write that way.

It reminds me of the stat...75% of all deaths happen within 25 miles of home. Well, where do people spend 75% of their life?

If more people wrote in the inverted style the heat images would change.

I am not advocating the inverted style. I am advocating that the entire article should be solid. And the intro should make clear the points to be covered. Good headers will keep the reader on site because long articles online invite ppl to scan before diving in.
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@KitK

I will put it together.
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