BillBelew.com
Motivation

When did you last have an original idea?1953

Belew private msg quote post Address this user
"The best way to boost your originality is to produce more ideas." Adam Grant
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Clydeart private msg quote post Address this user
Today in fact. Gotta keep it top secret though, the competition is watching every move.
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@Clydeart

That's what Solomon thought until he realized there is nothing new under the sun.
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Rev private msg quote post Address this user
"We are but dwarfs standing on the shoulders of giants!" --Bernard of Chartres, 12th Century (about 500 years before Sir Isaac).
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bdaoust private msg quote post Address this user
I always think my ideas are original until I read about them elsewhere within the next week or so...
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@bdaoust

Funny!
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@bdaoust

Kind of like you originally thought your idea was original.
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Clydeart private msg quote post Address this user
@belew, @Rev, At all, et al,

Solomon hit the nail on the head in lots of ways.

Rev Your "dwarfs on the shoulders of giants" is pretty true. My Dad showed me a sample transistor one day and said that they one day soon would take the place of the vacuum tube. I was 10. My H. S. graduation gift was an AM/FM receive the world's broadcasts transistor radio that fit in my hand. Today I have a "pocket computer" ne iPhone with much of the power of a minicomputer of the 70's.

I have had some conversations with millennials who claim their generation invented the ... I point out to them that they simply built on what my generation "invented" building on the inventions of our fathers. I get interesting reactions.
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Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@Clydeart

I hate to spoil this for you, but your iPhone doesn't have "much of the power of a minicomputer of the 70s" unless you've wrapped the case around an old Motorola "brick". Here's a little research and some personal memory to put it in perspective...

Mini-computers were "cheap" -- about $18,000 to $45,000 a pop -- and "powerful" by the days' standards (they pretty much maxed out at 32-bid addressing and 4 GB of storage. The popular DEC PDP-11 (16 bit and my first experience on minis), and later the VAX (32 bit) were powerful but way too much money for the work they actually did.

They were quickly outstripped when custom CMOS introduced us to the Intel 4040, the Motorola 68000, and others. The infamous DEC Alpha (64 bit RISC and my first Internet server) and, for home use, the Amiga and Unicorn (I loved the Unicorn!), quickly put power on the desktop.

None of these, the minis nor the desktops, though, had the power or capacity of a current smart phone. And, while all this was happening, a micro-chip revolution was going on that gave us the Z80, 8800, 6502, 8502 (I bet on this one!) and a host of so many others. The personal computer was born in all its many flavors from Apple to Orange.

In August of 1982, the Commodore 64 was considered the market leader in personal computing platforms. It went on to be the most successful (30 million units) computer ever created. It had lots of RAM (64KB) at a low price ($595) for the day. It had a "blazing" 1.02 MHz 6510 processor. Screen resolutions was a whopping 320x200 pixels. Things like 3 Mpixel video cameras, portable GPS, and 3G cellular weren't even invented yet, let alone Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. But the C-64 actually out-crunched most mini-computers.

In June of 2009 the world accepted the iPhone 3G S as the market leader. It had 4,000 times the RAM (256MB) for one-third the price (with an AT&T contract) as the C-64. It also had an additional 250,000 times as much memory (or 500,000, if you spring for the 32GB model) as the C64 in the form of its flash storage. It had a "fast" 600 MHz ARM -- that's almost 600 times faster processing than the C-64. Screen resolution was just 480x320 pixels. Video? GPS? 3G? Bluetooth? Got'em, baby! sold just over one million units in the first 3 days.

Both the C-64 and the iPhone were created by visionaries: Jack Tramiel, Steve Jobs, respectively, who built successful market-leading companies (Commodore, Apple) for their time.

I'll leave it for you to do the comparison with the current crop of smart phones. They make the iPhone 3G S look... well, maybe the "S" stood for slow?
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@Rev

Above and beyond again in sharing a history lesson.
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Clydeart private msg quote post Address this user
@ Rev
Thanks for the technical education on the evolution of computing power.
Motorola "brick"?
The first real computer I had was an Apple II then it morphed into an Apple II+ I bought it for business because it had an interesting program - VisiCalc which I used for business purposes, developing various "schedules" for my architectural drawings such as door & window schedules, equipment schedules, self calculating site analysis which showed how the land use and parking fit the zoning regulations. all kinds of stuff. I managed to develop a rudimentary CAD system on the apple II+ which helped with my repeat clients such as Baskin Robbins, William Flaggs Restaurants, etc.
My oldest son cut his programming teeth on the Apple II+ and later went on to bigger and better things in the "valley of sand" er, Silicon Valley.
Those PDP thingys I knew existed but was always fuzzy about their power or lack thereof.
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tammysoffices private msg quote post Address this user
So jumping in late here but absolutely an interesting discussion!

I wanted to transition slightly with all of these computer 'geeks'(said lovingly, as myself being somewhat of one) present, I have always been PC whether it be desktop or laptop, but wonder recently if really worth getting an Apple (laptop more than likely). What usually stops me is whether I will have to change much over especially in helping my clients. I know much has changed and many more programs existing to convert between PC & Apple but really wonder if it is worth it in the end?

Any takers on this discussion?
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@tammysoffices

Apples are wOrth it if you do what Apples do best.

Research and writing is abt 100% of what I do. PCs are almost disposable.

I know a lot of ppl who way overpaid for their wordprocessor = Apple.
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Clydeart private msg quote post Address this user
@tammysoffices I am firmly in the Apple camp. However in my architectural business (38 years) I have just about always been dual platform for various reasons.

The Apple II, II+, Mac fit the majority of my needs for graphics, 3D CAD, spreadsheets, simplified word processing, etc. The PC's I had fit the fact that much engineering software, energy compliance software, and the need to proof AutoCad documents before I sent them to engineers were written for PCs. Since I had side by side comparisons, I find that the PC is more problematic than the Macintosh with buggy Opsys, buggy CAD, and numerous (cumulative) hours wasted downloading the daily bug fixes, fending off internet attacks, etc. I kept the PCs with bookkeeping software off the internet and internal network therefore.

The necessary accounting software ran on both platforms fine.

The Apple-Mac platform suits my creative side well and so in retirement, I have only Apple stuff.

IF I were to recommend a platform for general purpose writing, (e.g. novels, reports with little graphics) I would say that probably the PC with the Microsoft suite would work well enough. Cheap, and MS Word is a lot less buggy now.

If you write and self publish books with lots of graphic and photo illustrations, then I would say the Macintosh platform is the way to go. As @Belew said "Apples are worth it if you do what Apples do best".
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Most things are worth what you pay for IF you use them for what they were made for.

Treadmills are not clothes racks ...
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Rev private msg quote post Address this user
If I had my choice I would run a cheap PC with Linux. It runs circles around Mac or Windoze. However, because most of my clients use Windoze I stick with that in order to be able to support them.
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Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@Clydeart

Motorola "Brick" ...


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Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew

Is it still a "history lesson" if you lived it?
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tammysoffices private msg quote post Address this user
Indeed! So what I am hearing is that Apples are great for the creatives if have money to invest in them? Thanks @Belew & @Clydeart.

I had to purchase ANOTHER laptop about 6 months ago but when I purchased the prior to this, I was told that they are only built to last 2-3 years. I never hear anyone with an Apple product complaining about having to purchase another one after only a few years.

Thanks for the insight.
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tammysoffices private msg quote post Address this user
Also what about program compatibility? Is that your reference @Rev ? If I were to get an Apple next time, what happens if I have a client who is using PC, would I be able convert files if needed (their's or mine to them)? Thanks!
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Clydeart private msg quote post Address this user
@tammysoffices Compatibility Mac to PC to Linux. The Mac programs I typically use are able to do two way transfers to corresponding programs on other platforms. Example: The Mac based 3D CAD system I used was able to seamlessly transfer files to Autodesk and many other CAD products so that various consultants and engineers I worked with were able to use them on their platforms.

If you are using MS Word or MS Office for Mac there is no problem transferring nor translating those documents back and forth that I am aware of.

The Mac word processor, Pages, works reasonably well transferring between platforms that use MS Word. However,the caveat is Pages is word processing and page layout light so some things do not work out well.

MS Word/MS Office for Mac are the better choice for most people I know who do serious writing and have Macs and send stuff back and forth to others.

I have no sound information about what works between Linux Opsys machines and either PC or Macs.
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Clydeart private msg quote post Address this user
@Rev Thanks for the Motorola "Brick". It looks like the Motorola "walk-Talkies" I used to communicate with my engineer squads in the service, except for the number pad.

As for the "history lesson" - if you live it and explain it to others it makes history come to life. Especially to those who are much younger.

I consider myself a Bridge Generation to those who have been taught nothing about what went on late 1800's to now because I experienced the stories my grandparents told regarding Europe of the 1870's to Gemini Two. My parents told of 1920's through/ until where/ I became cognizant of the world scene age 3 to 5+.

So, keep on giving history lessons!
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Clydeart private msg quote post Address this user
@tammysoffices regarding PC's lasting one or two years... Apple products used for many years ...

My personal experience in office and home is this: The PC's 2-3 years old generally have become sluggish and fitful as the MS operating system goes through numerous bug fixes and iterations. That said I have used the more expensive workstation class PCs (as expensive as a similarly equipped Apples BTW)for about as long as the Macs that were purchased at the same time.

My apples of all types have survived on average 5 to 7 years with several operating system iterations and perform(ed) very well all that time. I write to you on a 5 year old Mac laptop.
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tammysoffices private msg quote post Address this user
Thank you for added feedback that I request @Clydeart I greatly appreciate it!
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Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@tammysoffices

You will want to separate files (data or information) from applications (programs) in your thinking.

Data is data is data. A PDF file is a PDF file whether it's on a Mac, a PC, or a Linux box. A DOCX, JPG (JPEG), or TXT file is the same no matter which system it is on or transferred to.

Programs, or applications, things like word processors, web browsers, database managers, email readers, etc., are platform specific. While there my be a Firefox browser for the PC and the MAC, each is a distinctly different program and is not interchangeable across machines.

There are emulators for the Mac and Linux machines that will run Windows programs on those machines (though I don't know why anyone would want to -- a little like emulating a Volkswagon to make your Ferrari more common place -- but the results are less than perfect.

My daughter has a desktop Mac and a Mac notebook. She loves them. As I said earlier, I'm on a PC with Windows. We interact on live streaming platforms like Blab and Zoom. She emails me and I her. We collaborate on web projects and exchange files.

Just yesterday I sent her a ZIP file containing text (TXT), MS Word (DOC and DOCX), Open Office (ODT), image (JPG), video (MP4), and ebook (PDF), files with which I had been working, and for her to continue the process.

The files are universal types and, as long as we each have suitable programs (applications) with which to handle them, our computer type doesn't matter.
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