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Can someone Learn to draw?1980

tammysoffices private msg quote post Address this user
I am curious as to your opinions, or facts, on whether someone can learn to draw. For instance, I am very creative in many ways (ie: writing, scrapbook, digital art, etc...)but I can barely draw a stick figure. My sons are great artists.

Recently I have been desiring to draw or paint, but based on my past abilities, am inclined to not even try. So it made me wonder if worth spending money to learn if I do not have the 'gift' of drawing or painting.

Thoughts?
Post 1 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@tammysoffices

Anyone can learn to draw. Learning to draw well is a different matter.
Post 2 • IP   flag post
Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@tammysoffices

I disagree with @Belew. Anyone can learn to draw well. The difficulty is in separating the truly creative from the truly bad.


Post 3 • IP   flag post
Summerbay private msg quote post Address this user
I've taught drawing classes and workshops. Drawing is a set of skills you can learn. There are different methods but in the same way that anyone can learn to knit or build something, you can learn to draw. Find a training that teaches skills and doesn't depend on having natural talent, such as this one:

http://1099a0ur51sl4q2xpiljt9ixez.hop.clickbank.net/?tid=CID

Disclaimer: I've promoted this course before since it's the same drawing method that I've taught. No point re-inventing the wheel.
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Seniorpreneur private msg quote post Address this user
@tammysoffices Lifelong Learning is a huge global trend right now. Try some local colleges or senior centers. I live in Canada but I believe in the USA there is Osher Lifelong Learning Institute which offers liberal arts (drawing, painting, writing) courses at a reasonable price.
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Clydeart private msg quote post Address this user
@tammysoffices I echo the advice offered so far. I teach both children and adults drawing skills and painting in watercolors, etc.

In my opinion giftedness is not necessary to become a reasonably competent sketch artist or drawing creator. Some of those I have taught exhibited a level of giftedness it is true. But most have discovered that they can enjoy drawing and painting just for fun.

Bear in mind: Talent is 5 percent gift and 95 percent practice.

Your hesitation on gaining such a skill is basically a simple fear to overcome. One young lady (middle schooler) came to a summer art class I taught and was convinced she did not have art talent. At the end of the class she admitted she had lots of fun. The next summer she came to the class to have fun, listened to what I was teaching and demonstrating and was flabbergasted that I selected one of her art pieces to put up on the wall of the low income apartment offices (they were "underprivileged" children classes). She basically did her school project illustrations that next year with confidence. She draws for fun now.

Most people can scribble recognizable simple forms, stick figures and shade things like a cube naturally. To take the skill of drawing to a level of average competence you can take beginning drawing classes as suggested above at the local colleges, some art societies have relatively inexpensive classes, and of course, there's a bar-gazillion books on sketching on Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

So try something new! Art, particularly drawing and sketching, will broaden your mind and teach you powers of observation.
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tammysoffices private msg quote post Address this user
Wow all great advice thank you! I will look into these things. @Rev - I may be able to do those -lol. I have never really desired to learn it before, just accepted that it was not a 'gift', but lately wondered if I could use my creativity in this area also. So thank you all for the encouragement!
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
What is bad/good is relative, no?
Post 8 • IP   flag post
Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@tammysoffices

If you can do "those" then you will be just fine. :o)
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user



I started trying to draw my own Wilbys.
Post 10 • IP   flag post
Rev private msg quote post Address this user
I've likely shared this here before but, hey, a good story is in the RE-telling!

A friend of mine is a piano teacher and, one time back in the late 70s or early 80s when we were talking about her work, I made the comment that it must be hard teaching the young kids, getting them to pay attention, stay focused, and practice.

"No," she said, "the kids are the good ones. Their desire to learn and to please is amazing. It is the adults that are the problem ones."

She went on to explain that adults came to her wanting to learn one specific piece so they could show off to their friends at parties and such. The told her they didn't want to learn musical notation or scales or timing, "Just teach me," they would say, "how to play Music Box Dancer!"

Hey, why start at the bottom and waste all that time and effort when you can jump right in at the top!

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tammysoffices private msg quote post Address this user
All very good and valid points and I know if I truly have a desire to learn this I will likely learn it. I have spent so much time over the last several years 'learning' business, marketing, and many more skills & services to promote our business, that I was thinking it would be nice to try something different. I see a lot of talented people in this thread though!
Post 12 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@tammysoffices

I, too, am contemplating a new 'career.'

Good for you for trying.
Post 13 • IP   flag post
tammysoffices private msg quote post Address this user
Oh...a completely different career?

I do not think mine would be a 'new' career just want something that may be fun and relaxing to do. I do not suspect I will be terribly good (oxymoron there) - but I will give it my all as I do everything.

So what are you thinking about trying @belew?
Post 14 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@tammysoffices

I am planning to step away from this whole marketing thing.

Create smth I am interested in and market myself.
Post 15 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@tammysoffices

How are your self-learning drawing lessons coming along?
Post 16 • IP   flag post
macnamal private msg quote post Address this user
For sure! You can learn to draw, as well as you can learn to play piano or a new sport. You need patience, attention, desire, passion and just let your brain to create its own neuronal interconnections (ergo: new skills). Human brain is like a computer, therefore you can program it! So my answer is: absolutely YES, you can learn to draw.
Post 17 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@macnamal

Is there an age that is too late to learn to draw?
Post 18 • IP   flag post
tammysoffices private msg quote post Address this user
good question @belew...I wonder also, but tend to think IF we are continuing to grow our minds actively. In other words doing classes...learning new things...even crossword puzzles can help to keep your mind active; then should be able to learn I suppose from what others have said in earlier discussion. The only other problem would be at a certain age, I would think, if hands become shaky at all???
Post 19 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@tammysoffices

My hands don't shaor so much but the table keeps moving.
Post 20 • IP   flag post
macnamal private msg quote post Address this user
There is NO AGE to start to learn... Whatever! I repeat. The limits and conditions (age, for example, or disabilities) should be only this, conditions and conditionals, but nothing else! Probably you'd spend more time, only this.
Post 21 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@macnamal

I believe you. I really do.

I could do a lot better at a lot of things if the table would stop moving and the people in front of me would stand still.

How did you get started?
Post 22 • IP   flag post
Clydeart private msg quote post Address this user
@belew @macnamal probably started as I did, pencil in hand and paper right side up and with sheer determination managed to get the lines to sort of look like what I was seeing. Then get more paper and you keep doing it over and over. I will be teaching a beginning sketching class on Wednesday, September 28th at Venture Church's Creative Night 7 PM. You can sign up on their website when the sign ups become live this weekend. OR, I can sign you up if you'd like. Class is free, but you need art pencils, erasers, and a good spiral bound sketch pad all available at Michael's arts and Crafts.

BTW - the phenomena you describe as table moving and subject not still is easily overcome. Just get a table that doesn't balance on your knees and use a photograph as the "model".
{;<
Post 23 • IP   flag post
tammysoffices private msg quote post Address this user
@belew - love your comedic responses - always!

I agree and think we can always learn, but does seem to become more difficult the older we get. I think it starts with a mindset to learn. We have all met people who think they 'know it all' and do not need to learn - the 'unteachables' (no not 'untouchables' - although I do not think I would do that either).

I think if you really want to do something it is possible. I think some have more 'talent' than others but it can be done. I am hoping to be one of those.

@Clydeart are you doing a 'virtual' class as well?
Post 24 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@tammysoffices

Enough of the right kind of practice broken down and repeated correctly and most things are doable to some level ... unless you are me ... and too cantankerous to even try.
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