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When does a blog post become overkill?2259

Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Someone sent me a link to look at this week ... and asked me what I thought.

It was 101 ways to do something.

I got as far as number 5 and quit reading.

Instead, I cut and pasted the whole thing into a Google.doc and did a word count.

12,538 words.

Obviously, somebody worked very hard on this. No argument there.

But here's my feedback -

"I got as far as #5 and quit reading.

Instead I cut and pasted into a Google.doc to get the word count - 12,538 words!

This is not a blog post ... it's an eBook.

It may end up being searched and found but nobody will read it. They may book mark it, but they won't read it.

It's overkill ... imho."

When do you TL;DR?

What is overkill to you?
Post 1 • IP   flag post
Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
I don't believe people go on line to read blog posts which are long. The internet itself seems to demand short, sharp answers to queries. Long blog posts take time to read, and a much greater commitment from the audience.

IMHO 12,538 is a generous eBook, and quite a lot of blog posts.

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Member philipwatling private msg quote post Address this user
When I started writing adverts for my book they were quite long. Steadily over time and maybe with the influence of the 140-charcter Twitter limit, they have got shorter and shorter. I figured people made their minds up fast and if they cannot be grabbed in the first ten seconds, the post is too long. Mine generally start, "Hit by car. Died!" Heck, my book even starts, "Bang! The car hit me." I came up with that long before Twitter
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Top Contributor Steve private msg quote post Address this user
Neil Patel from Kiss metrics writes large blog posts... his got a massive audience that read every word.

As you know you should have a mixture of blog posts... most of mine fall in the 800 word range... but I've some running to three or four thousand...

If you mix it up, know your audience you'll get that engagement.
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Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@Steve

"know your audience" -- that is the key!

The 12,000 words in @Belew's original post could easily be a month's worth of smaller posts (300 - 450 words). If you get on a writing jag you can easily publish daily or bi-weekly, especially if you use a post manager.

@Steve, what was the post management plugin you recommended before?
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Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
The rules are different if you have a ready audience waiting for your post...like Patel does.

How many short-form poste did he and others like him write BEFORE he started writing only long form poste?

If you are just stsrting out and all you write are long form posts you are fighting a losing battle.

I've done the research with a lot of my clients and students. The numbers have been verified by other companies with a deep database of clients. .. you need something around 400 articles over 4-8 months to climb out of the 'sandbox'...then if you have the traffic and following you desire you can start going long form.
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Top Contributor Steve private msg quote post Address this user
I've never written a short form article that you mention... yet I climbed out of the sandbox...

In my opinion it's actually more important to write for your audience and to forget about Google.

Google is smart enough to know how well your articles engage an audience... and this affects ranking.

Just my opinion of course...
Post 7 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@Steve you're right.

Its abt the audience.

Its stupid to think that an 800 word answer to a 200 word question is better just because its long.

Or thst a 200 word answer is adequate for an 800 word question.

Satisfy the query is best.
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Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
Absolutely! Write for your audience and forget about Google. If what you write about is good, Google will accept it. If not Google will likely ignore it. Your clients will too.
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Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
And if the end game is to please Google, the content creator will miss out on more than half of the internet. Google controls 60+% of search ... but not social media and video search (well, they sort of do).

Do good work. Simple as that.
Post 10 • IP   flag post
Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
@philipwatling That's a great opening line!

I have practised many 'elevator pitches' in my time - short, sweet and to the point.

We authors have to stick together
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