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How to Start a Business After Your Turn 402325

Belew private msg quote post Address this user
It's funny that way ... I thought that when I got older people would care less.

I got interviewed by Elaine Benoit on How to Start a Business After You Turn 40.

It could have been titled After You Turn 50.

Give it a listen ... or not.



Post 1 • IP   flag post
jaybeacham private msg quote post Address this user
I really enjoyed Bill's story. Thanks.
jay Beacham
Post 2 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@jaybeacham

Ah, shucks.

Thanks for listening.


Post 3 • IP   flag post
alexchan private msg quote post Address this user
Resonant with me... since I started 3 different business after 40 (I'm 46 now).

Next week I'm going to launch a World's First and possibly spin-off another business. It's a tech start-up... and I'm already a dinosaur amongst these 'young people'.

And Colonel Sanders didn't start KFC till he's after 60. So age is really no excuse.

Nice one! @belew

I'm going to be on radio too next week over here in Singapore. Perhaps I can share that if it's online.
Post 4 • IP   flag post
Sagekreyol private msg quote post Address this user
@alexchan what radio show will you be on? Are there any Singapore meetups for content writers?

Check out my profile
Post 5 • IP   flag post
alexchan private msg quote post Address this user
@sagekrepol It's on 93.8Live - A Slice of Life.

Timing as follows:
- Monday 13 Mar from 9:30pm & 10:30pm
- Saturday 18 Mar from 2:30pm & 3:30pm
- Sunday 19 Mar from 6:30pm & 7:30pm

2nd time on the show.

As for groups, there's one or two writers' group on www.meetup.com. Perhaps you can check them out.

Nice to meet you here!!
Post 6 • IP   flag post
Seniorpreneur private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew Thanks MaturePreneur for telling us your very personal entrepreneurial story. I believe that it's time for seniors 50+ to become business or social entrepreneurs. You mentioned on the podcast that you didn't have a mentor to learn from but basically did most of your earlier business projects all by yourself.

If we are going to teach the entrepreneurial journey to the 50+ potential entrepreneurs we need some new ideas on how we can get the older demographic to come together to discuss their entrepreneurial ideas. I find that in general local in person Meetups don't work. Is there a possibility that an online group could be created such as this one to satisfy more of the older entrepreneurs?
Post 7 • IP   flag post
zsazsa private msg quote post Address this user
It is great! Thanks for sharing. People are so much afraid of age!
Post 8 • IP   flag post
Rev private msg quote post Address this user
I have made three very significant changes in my "later life" at 49, 60, and now at 65. These changes have involved divorce, cross-continent and inter-country moves, other relocations, and major changes in business.

I'm looking forward to what's next!
Post 9 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@Seniorpreneur

What do you have in mind?

I have ideas ... always ideas ... not always good ideas ... but I am seldom paralyzed to try something.

What do you think is a good approach?
Post 10 • IP   flag post
Rev private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seniorpreneur
Is there a possibility that an online group could be created such as this one to satisfy more of the older entrepreneurs?


Early in my ecommerce days I built a website for a person who wanted their products categorized. They sold jewelry boxes that were also music boxes and were all in the shape of musical instruments.

In one example she had pianos. So I created a category for pianos. She wanted sub-categories to break them out further. I added sub-categories for upright, grand, electric, etc.

She wanted further breakout by size and color, etc., to the end point where each sub-sub-sub-category had exactly one item in it. Why have categories at all?

Sometimes, breaking out forums or groups into sub-groups can be less than desirable. I'm 65. I get lots of great advice from 80 year olds and 25 year olds. Much of my own good experience came when I was younger.

Separating out seniors because they might feel more comfortable, or some other arbitrary reason, is more likely to be counter productive.

If you feel it necessary, Bill may be willing to set up a sub-group for you. I am a member of one such sub-group though I'm not sure if I've every participated in it. The main group is where all the members are reachable. The classroom is where the action is developing.

Become a teacher in the classroom. Teach for seniors (or however you define your target market) but let everyone participate. You might be surprised who is interested in what you have to share.
Post 11 • IP   flag post
Rev private msg quote post Address this user
And just by way of follow-on...

I taught a class in Florida last Tuesday to a group of mostly new entrepreneurs who were looking for information to help take their new businesses online. I think all of that group was over 40 with the majority 55+.

In my experience there is no lack of persons 55 and over looking to engage in online business.
Post 12 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev
Become a teacher in the classroom. Teach for seniors
@Seniorpreneur @Rev may be on to smth here.

A classroom for seniors taught by seniors.
Post 13 • IP   flag post
Seniorpreneur private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew I think that a classroom for seniors 50+ taught by experienced seniors would be a good starting point. The teachers should be experienced in both online & offline entrepreneurial projects. There are many seniors that don't have any small business experience but they are very knowledgeable in their own career choice. eg. In Canada we have a 50+ retired electrical engineer with other courses in computer sciences but no small business experience. His startup project is e-sight (digital glasses) that allow blind people to have some sight. It was a slow product development process and slower yet market introduction. It might have been possible to have this talented inventor get access to a classroom of online business experts. Just an idea here.
Post 14 • IP   flag post
Seniorpreneur private msg quote post Address this user
@Rev I agree that there is a sizable increase in the number of Seniors 50+ trying out small business in their second or third career. Your recent teaching experience in Florida could be a great test case for finding out what these seniors over 40 actually decided to do after their teaching experience. Did they really want to learn about online business opportunities OR maybe they wanted to invent a product or service offline? How many actually had some small business experience. And the big question- How many actually had a feasible new product or service idea to get started on their own entrepreneurial journey? Thanks!
Post 15 • IP   flag post
Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@Seniorpreneur

In this case, my task wasn't to -- and therefore I didn't -- get into areas like business experience, actual product or service, etc. While those are things that I would explore with my own clients or a group I headed up, my mandate for this particular session was exploring a particular case study involving SEO.

I think you are right on about the business area for many (most?) of these seniorpreneurs. Often they come directly from the work place, mostly from positions reporting to someone higher up, and often not directly responsible for developing their own plans and procedures. Rather, they carry out plans produced by someone else.

Small business assistance is important. Organizations like SCORE and CanadaOne place seasoned professionals in front of beginners and those who have figured out a little extra help can go a long way. But sometimes there is the need for smaller groups and more focused engagement.

I think this forum, especially the classroom area, can do just that.
Post 16 • IP   flag post
jaybeacham private msg quote post Address this user
Experience is overrated and holds many back from trying or letting someone try.
So you want to do something, do it.
Harland Sanders didn't stop because of his age why should we?
Post 17 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@jaybeacham

I believe in the go ahead and try as well.

I also believe in learning from others.

Figure out what works for you and work it ... the operative word being work.

Do something. Doing nothing results in nothing being done.
Post 18 • IP   flag post
Rev private msg quote post Address this user
Doing the wrong something, though, can be worse then doing nothing. Like driving in the wrong direction -- takes you farther from where you want to be!

Experience is seldom over-rated. It is the lack of experience that is under-rated or under recognized -- and it can kill what you are trying to do.

Not having experience is easy to overcome: get some! Having experience generally makes things easier, especially when that experience applies to what you want to do.

I have found that people just starting out to create their own business forget about their experience, trying to do something they no nothing about. Look to you experience first, and you may find the answers you need.

After that, learn your craft.
Post 19 • IP   flag post
Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Movement beats non movement. You can always change direction.

When you aren't moving you are usually in a standstill or just spinning.

The best thing you can do is the right thing.
2nd best is something.
Worst is nothing.
Post 20 • IP   flag post
jerri private msg quote post Address this user
I enjoyed the interview. I am trying my hand at being an entrepreneur at 56. Still working on the real world though.😊
Post 21 • IP   flag post
zsazsa private msg quote post Address this user
Yes, you are right Belew. Action is the trigger of emotions and emotions are the machinery of life. Without motion one is only vegetating. I also think that one always does the right thing because one chooses what one is capable of handling at the given time. Therefore every choice is the right one. The only wrong choice is not taking any.
Post 22 • IP   flag post
Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@zsazsa

Can you choose to do nothing? Would doing nothing then be the right choice?
Post 23 • IP   flag post
zsazsa private msg quote post Address this user
Yes, it would be for you. Not everybody is capable or driven to do things. Or not strong enough to take the hussle. And of course as in everything, we take the consequenses of our choice. Also you might realize, while you are doing "nothing" that you want to learn or do something. Doing nothing can also be the time to take an inventory of your existence. You need that from time to time - I tell my students to do it twice a year - and for that you need to step out of life to see yourself in reality. Human achievement is based upon learning and aquiring knowledge that you can put into practice. However, it is not only business. Money making is for survival. Well the degree of your survival is up to you so you need provide accordingly.
Post 24 • IP   flag post
Seniorpreneur private msg quote post Address this user
@zsazsa I agree about the need to take an inventory of your existence. For seniors 50+ who are searching for a second or third career try taking a long walk in the wilderness. I've done this myself. However, personally I needed to take over 20 of these long walks (3-4 hours each) before I was able to get some possible ideas for my own retirement lifestyle.
Post 25 • IP   flag post
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