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Using Language that Grandmother approves2331

Belew private msg quote post Address this user
I have run into a few people over the past couple of weeks who's language would make a 'sailor blush.'

I'd know. I was a sailor.

I get that people are individuals and each can do as they please.

I am also somewhat a 'prude' in their eyes. I don't care. That's not the point.

The point is by using language that grandmother approves you are not likely to turn anyone off. Whereas, if you ignore sensitivities and take a devil may care attitude you are likely to turn away prospects. Maybe you don't care. If so ... then no biggie.

Marketers do not need to think, "Am I being PC?". They might, however, consider choosing language that is not offensive and welcoming ... to all the grandmothers and their kids and their grandkids.

I was sitting in a Panera ... my stomping grounds and some dad what on a tirade because he forgot to tell them to leave off the avocado or some such California veggie.

Loud ... words that started with F and rhymed with truck and s and rhymed with it, and b that rhymed with itch and ... just in case nobody heard him the 3rd or 4th time he kept repeating himself to his 13-14 year old son and 10-11 year old daughter!!

All the while ... they were discussing visitation arrangements with their mother who he is now separated from. Really? I wonder why.

Marketers need to use language that grandmothers would approve of. So do dads ... or maybe I am just a prude.


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RogerBruner private msg quote post Address this user
I SO totally agree. Although many novelists insist that bad language makes their books more realistic, most of us in the CBA (Christian Booksellers Association) insist that a truly skillful writer should be able to demonstrate realism by various means other than offensive language.
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@RogerBruner

Back at you in the SO totally agree.

I tell my daughter that people who resort to using foul language only do so because they don't have the facility with English to make themselves understood elsewise.
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KathrynLang private msg quote post Address this user
Being from the South and having had a Southern Belle grandmother - YES!

Thank you.

My grandfather always said that people who have to curse and swear are showing their lack of intelligence.

I will confess, though, that not everyone had a Southern Belle grandmother in their life and not everyone sees some words as the same vulgarity as others. Not just because you were one, but because I did a 3 month internship at NAS Cecil Field, sailors come to mind. The language they use is "normal" so they don't always recognize when they are using the "bad" words.
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@KathrynLang

I sometimes had difficulty getting sailors to understand me because they only knew some expressions by their vulgar forms and I refused to resort to use the language.

It was fun ... but not always.

"Oh you mean the *&^#?

"No, I meant the widget on the ..."
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SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew So true!

If I need to hear swearing I'll go to the football. I don't want to read bad words online.
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Rev private msg quote post Address this user
What I find equally offensive, though in an entirely different way, is adults that teach there children "alternative" words to use instead of the old stand-bys... you know,

Oh FRACK!

Well, JEEZ...

What the SHIP was that?

It's okay, they say, because they are not swear words.

Sorry, I say, but it is the intent, and they are NOW!
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RogerBruner private msg quote post Address this user
I especially find "JEEZ" offensive because there's no mistaking the fact it's almost "Jesus." In fact, I've asked my wife to please not play "jeez" in Words with Friends because I feel so strongly about it.

Jesus may just be a word to some people, but He's a whole lot more than that to me.

Sermon over. For now, anyhow. *G*
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@RogerBruner "G" is a derivative for God.

I teach my kids and lwad by example to say nothing at all.
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RogerBruner private msg quote post Address this user
Saying nothing at all works! And for me "*G* is "grin."
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