BillBelew.com
Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
I just read this email subject line:

10 advices on how to get more out of your email marketing.

What do you do when you come across bad grammar? Shrug your shoulders and keep reading or ignore it? Why?
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Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@SusanDay

At least the got what would be the correct choice between advice and advise -- I hate when they are used incorrectly; same with sell and sale!

But as far as misuse of the word grammatically, there isn't much you can do. On occasion I have asked politely if they would be open to receiving a correction on their grammar and, more often then not, I get a not so polite reply.

I do work word usage, and other related common grammar issues into presentations where the fit with the hope someone is listening.

This item is for sale and I hope to sell it today. (correct)

I have made a number of sells on eBay. I hope to sale more today. (incorrect)

Please advise me on what I should do. Your advice is always appreciated. (correct)

Please advice me on what I should do. Your advise is always appreciated. (incorrect)
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Member GELTMAN private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by SusanDay
I just read this email subject line:

10 advices on how to get more out of your email marketing.

What do you do when you come across bad grammar? Shrug your shoulders and keep reading or ignore it? Why?


I'm no longer sure. It seems logical that to write a blog, or any communication to a wide audience, grammar, spelling, or punctuation may be critical in securing readers' attention. On the other hand, I'm in the Technical world, where these usual English language topics are less important than the exact specifications of the device or system which is being discussed.
However, I looked on Dictionary.com, and I did find they believe the word "advices" is indeed a plural form of "advice". See here: definition # 2. on "advice"
a communication, especially from a distance, containing information:
Advice from abroad informs us that the government has fallen. Recent diplomatic advices have been ominous.

So, I suppose asking Kelsey Grammer about grammar and several advices is potentially feasible. The previous sentence may indeed be correct, at least for the 3 items discussed.
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Member RogerBruner private msg quote post Address this user
I'm afraid I would assume that person's advice wasn't apt to be valuable. When fiction writers ignore an occasional "rule," that's one thing. But even if this person was just trying to be cute or get my attention, I would just shake my head and delete that email without reading it. Or check to see if it came from a source I could unsubscribe from before deleting it.
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Member KathrynLang private msg quote post Address this user
Maybe one of the top tips is to have an "error" in the message as a way to start the conversation
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Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
We used to say, "ain't ain't in the dictionary so you ain't supposed to use ain't!" However, today, ain't is in the dictionary and is an acceptable contraction, though I have no idea of what!

"Irregardless" is now also an accepted word even though it was a double negative and incorrect usage just a couple of dozen years ago.

Those who manage the lexicon claim the language is "living and fluid" and must be updated according to accepted use.

In my experience, "advice" has no plural. Advice from many sources is still, collectively, just advice. But, hey, what do I know?
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Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
@RogerBruner I tend to agree with you.

But, I think @KathrynLang has a good point.
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Member RogerBruner private msg quote post Address this user
SusanDay, you may be right about KathrynLang's point. But I'll still dismiss anyone who makes obvious spelling errors as someone who's not careful enough to proofread before sending something out. I drive myself crazy double checking even Facebook posts, and the times I fail to so invariably have a misspelling or a very awkward wording that even I couldn't interpret correctly. So I guess I'd have to dismiss myself, too. *G*
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Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@RogerBruner

Knowing and doing are two different things. We'll forgive you. Now forgive yourself and get back to writing!
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Member GELTMAN private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev
@SusanDay

At least the got what would be the correct choice between advice and advise -- I hate when they are used incorrectly; same with sell and sale!

But as far as misuse of the word grammatically, there isn't much you can do. On occasion I have asked politely if they would be open to receiving a correction on their grammar and, more often then not, I get a not so polite reply.

I do work word usage, and other related common grammar issues into presentations where the fit with the hope someone is listening.

This item is for sale and I hope to sell it today. (correct)

I have made a number of sells on eBay. I hope to sale more today. (incorrect)

Please advise me on what I should do. Your advice is always appreciated. (correct)

Please advice me on what I should do. Your advise is always appreciated. (incorrect)


Please do not forget to include use of the idiom, "More often than not". (correct) Reference: The Free Dictionary LINK:

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/more+often+than+not

This may fit the Idiom, "The blind leading the blind".
GELTMAN SAD
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Member GELTMAN private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev
We used to say, "ain't ain't in the dictionary so you ain't supposed to use ain't!" However, today, ain't is in the dictionary and is an acceptable contraction, though I have no idea of what!

"Irregardless" is now also an accepted word even though it was a double negative and incorrect usage just a couple of dozen years ago.

Those who manage the lexicon claim the language is "living and fluid" and must be updated according to accepted use.

In my experience, "advice" has no plural. Advice from many sources is still, collectively, just advice. But, hey, what do I know?


According to Merriam-Webster,here's the contraction:
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ain't
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Member RogerBruner private msg quote post Address this user
Thanks, Rev. And even though I'd proofed my previous post, I still left out a word. *LOL*
Post 12 • IP   flag post
Member morrnel private msg quote post Address this user
Are we talking about American, British, Aussie, Kiwi or some other grammar? Then we have the versions of ESLs. I feel as though I grew up with a very good education.

I view poor grammar as a result of not having a good education. And that has a lot to do with how much reading one did over the years.

On my flight back from Guangzhou to Beijing, I watched the movie "Merchant of Venice" and enjoyed 16th century English. I thought how much our language has (had?) changed over the centuries.

When I see a poorly written subject line, how can I assume the person has well thought out advice?
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Top Contributor Steve private msg quote post Address this user
Have you consideted your audience... somwtimes audience members will search with misspelled words and bad grammar... those websites that cater to both could steal a march.
Post 14 • IP   flag post
Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@GELTMAN

Quote:
Originally Posted by GELTMAN
According to Merriam-Webster,here's the contraction:
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ain't


Nice try, but I don't think so!
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Member GELTMAN private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev
@GELTMAN

Quote:
Originally Posted by GELTMAN
According to Merriam-Webster,here's the contraction:
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ain't


Nice try, but I don't think so!


Rev, thanks for your response. I neglected an important word: Colloquial. Often, although one of the bibles of correct grammar, meaning, spelling, etc., can be "Merriam-Webster", it is also very possible that these 3 or more items can be correct in perhaps the most important bible: Colloquial (as in informal).
Colloquial, in this context, means, "characteristic of or appropriate to ordinary or familiar conversation rather than formal speech or writing". Please forgive me for failing to include this item. "My bad".
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Member KathrynLang private msg quote post Address this user
Geltman - isn't he one of the lesser known Avengers?
Post 17 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
The reason spammers spam is because it still works.

My little sis called me a while back absolutely convinced some guy somewhere wanted to send her some money. She needed my help in telling him which of her bank numbers she should give him.

Totally serious she was.

I cleaned out her bank account ... to protect her, of course. 8-)
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