BillBelew.com
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Striking while the fire's hot or ???2532

Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Too often I have found that someone was totally on board, ready and raring to go ... only to see that fire go out or go to a flicker in need of fanning.

Do you think it's a good idea to strike while the fire is hot = get the signature/contract or is it best to wait?

I have found that I can 'get the contract' but it becomes very labor intensive working with someone who really doesn't want to be there after all.

But I wonder if I leave money on the table by waiting until the would-be client is ready instead of prodding them into doing business.

What's been your experience?
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SunilBhaskaran private msg quote post Address this user
Of course, it is impossible to come up with an answer that applies to all situations.
Depending on the scope of the project, I would tend to lean towards going slow especially if it is an involved project.
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TParker private msg quote post Address this user
I prefer someone who is fully committed over worrying about handling someone with buyer's remorse.
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@TParker

Do you find that once someone is 'in' they will come around and appreciate that you spurred them into making a commitment?
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gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
This is very timely for me, interestingly enough.

I just secured a contract for a decent sized freelance writing job that is new to me. I "went" for it right away, but the negotiations took several weeks, so I had time to settle down and step back to see if I was just dazzled or it was something I really didn't want to do?

I think a certain amount of reflection is always good before taking on a project that is not routine.
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TParker private msg quote post Address this user
I have often regretted rushing into a contract or encouraging someone to sign with me quickly. Now I tend to almost talk people out of signing because I want them to be absolutely sure I'm the freelancer they want for the job. When the client has a better understanding of me and what I can do for them, things just run more smoothly.
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@TParker @gspieler

Good perspective from the two of you. I am facing the prospects of signing a pretty hefty contract ... but am wondering how it's all going to play out withOUT the client totally on board. Or am I his client?

That's often a consideration - when there is no clear agreement about who is actually working for whom? No?
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TParker private msg quote post Address this user
You have instincts for a reason. If you "gut" says something isn't quite right, listen. Sometimes it is just a matter of figuring out where the problem lies and fixing it. Sometimes you have to completely walk away. But if you are committing a lot of time and money, better to be sure. Contract breakups are never pretty.
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
We usually, most often, know better... too often, however, we just don't like what we know.
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Steve private msg quote post Address this user
Systems... you need to work out some systems to ensure your prospects are right for you and that they are invested in the outcome.

To give you an example, if someone purchases a rental website from me... its low cost and so the invest from the client is low. However the rental period starts straight away and so if they delay content for example they still end up paying monthly... this helps ensure things continue to progress along.

For larger projects i prequalify... the deposit is large and delays end up costing the client more... my contract also tackles this... allowing me to charge more for wasting my time chasing up...

Just an idea
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve
purchases a rental website


What's this?
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Rev private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve
Systems... you need to work out some systems to ensure your prospects are right for you and that they are invested in the outcome.


Exactly. @Belew, you need to examine how you are bringing people to the table in the first place. Are they just prospects and you have to, I think you said, prod them into doing business.

Isn't it better to have them come to the table wanting the products and/or services you offer, ready to make a purchase? If you have to prod them into submission they are probably not good prospects in the first place.

Talk to your wife about how she snared you. Seriously.
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Steve private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belew
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve
purchases a rental website


What's this?


Instead of people purchasing a website they instead rent or lease one from me, it's 100% tax deductible as a bonus, been doing this since the nineties ...

To purchase a website from me, costs upwards of $10K ... to give it some perspective.
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