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Is self publishing a good option?2577

Member Natishafost private msg quote post Address this user
Hello all, I want to thank you guys for all the support, to those who took the time to help me with my situations. Now I ask for another favor and that is for advice with my book. I am in the publishing phase and it's all new to me and I did get my manuscript accepted but I'm wondering if self-publishing is a better option. If you all have any feedback please let me know what worked for you.
thank you all again
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Member gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
@Natishafost- Glad you had good support here. I don't have some of the information others received about your book, but I can share my experience and what my California Writers Club friends seem to like.

So, I don't know if your book is fiction or non-fiction/memoir. I went the commercial route in that I landed a literary agent and she sold it to a major publisher. It was a lot more work than I anticipated, but I had the advantage of a commercial publishers reach into getting the book into bookstores and help with PR.

Self publishers get to keep a bigger share of the pie, so to speak, but the biggest complaints I get from friends who self publish is the visibility issue. One way to go around this is to pay for a distributor to do that for you.

You said your book was now accepted? What does that mean? By a publisher or agent?

To sum it up, those who self publish have more control and again, get more money on book sales. Those to go the commercial route have the advantage of major distribution, therefore visibility.

Hope this helps.
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Member Natishafost private msg quote post Address this user
Thank you for the response,
so yes my book is a memoir I am telling my story and a publisher company has accepted my work but I don't know much about it so I don't know who's who's or what is the right company. I guess I should find an agent to help me through the process because I honestly don't know what to expect so I don't know if I'm in a good place.
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Member gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
@Natishafost--You are very smart to recognize this. One way to judge a legitimate publisher is if they are charging you to publish your book and you are note "self publishing." I totally agree that we don't know the industry and can be losing some important elements of the deal.

Since you have a publisher, it shouldn't be difficult to find an agent in your market.

Do you know how to go about getting the right agent for your genre? Writer's Market is very helpful if you don't already subscribe.
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Member Natishafost private msg quote post Address this user
No, I don't know how to go about getting an agent, any advice
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Member gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
There are several ways to find a literary agent.

Some attend writers conferences who also have agents on hand. You usually have to "buy" separate tickets to pitch agents.

Other ways are to "cold call" agents.

If you have friends to have agents you can ask for a referral.

Or, my best advice would be to subscribe to Writers Market
http://www.writersmarket.com. It'a a goldmine of information for all writers. You can do a selective search for writers to rep memoir writers.

Keep in mind you may be required to submit a non-fiction book proposal. http://www.writersdigest.com/qp7-migration-books/publish-nonfiction.

But, be sure when you writer to agents, BE SURE to tell them you have a publisher. Also, legitimate agents DO NOT charge you. They take their 15% which they earn.

Hope this helps.
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Member KathrynLang private msg quote post Address this user
I had a friend that had a publisher before she had an agent. She wanted someone to help her work through the contract portion of the publishing deal.

Indie Publishing and Traditional Publishing both have their benefits and downfalls.

Knowing what you want from the process AND what you expect from the process will help you choose.
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Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
Self-publishing is awesome but, like so much else in life, you need to know what's going on before you jump in.

My ex-wife and I used to run a small indie publishing company that did the work or guided the author through the steps of doing it themselves.

Many of the people who came to us had already tried to do it themselves and has messed things up or just found it too difficult.

You should know that while there are still big advance payments available from publishers, you need to have something important to offer in order to generate these today. Even traditional houses are starting to expect clients to front-end fund the first run of books and even do their own promotion. Most vanity publishers will require advance payment for 10,000, 20,000, or even 50,000 books.

I have several cases of books in my garage from a friend who went the vanity route and could never get them distributed. We find they make great fire starter for the wood stove.

Know what you want, what you expect, and what you are getting into.
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Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@Rev

Fire starters?!

Ouch.

Why would anybody ever print out a book again?

And if they really must .... POD (Print On Demand) is the ONLY way to go.
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Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
There's no hope for me when I can't even self-publish.

Yeesh!
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Member gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
I have several friends who have self-published and some that have gone to smaller publishers and shared the cost. They are very happy with the process.

The issue with commercial publishing and the upfront bonus is that you have to earn that back before you get any money from the sale of your book. So, the bigger the advance, the more you have pay back.

Now, why go the commercial route? Visibility and yes the publishers still do a fair amount of marketing on your behalf. Not necessarily what they did years ago, but a phone call from a publisher still gets more results that from the writer.

Also, a lot depends on your book? Some books really don't need commercial publishers, such as a book about your business. Or, if you are a new fiction writer, it can be very frustrating as many publishers only look at "agented authors," meaning they won't respond directly to authors, only to agents.

Another note: Be careful of agents who want to charge you money. No legitimate agent charges up front. They get 15 percent of what you get and they earn it. Any agent that lands you a publisher is worth even more. Tough publishing world out there.
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Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@gspieler

Do you know of anyone who went the route of trying to garner pre-orders before they wrote or published a book?
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Member gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
@billbelew

Not that I can remember. However, I will put a word out to my CWC friends.
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Member KathrynLang private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew The 10 Minute Novelist did pre-sales on her second book "When the Timer Dings" - I'm not sure how much she has done in pre-sales though.
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Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew of course you can self publish!
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Member Natishafost private msg quote post Address this user
I'm curios too because I have been contacted from self publishing companies but not traditional ones
Post 16 IP   flag post
Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natishafost
self publishing companies


Isn't that the classic example of an oxymoron? (Since we're talking about writing after all!)
Post 17 IP   flag post
Member KathrynLang private msg quote post Address this user
A self-publishing company is the contractor that builds your book that you are going to publish yourself.

Indie-publishing is when you are the contractor.

Hybrid publishing is a blend of self and traditional.

A traditional publishing company is a home builder and you rent space.

That may not be exact, but it is close.
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