BillBelew.com
Business AdviceMotivation

How do you compensate for seasons in work?2681

Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
My schedule (more precisely my daughter's schedule) is different every week this summer.

I am driving to a different destination at different times to different camps every week ... for abt 8 weeks straight.

No complaints on being tapped as the shuttle driver. I love doing it.

However, the moving schedule plays complete havoc on my working rhythm ... or lack of one.

How do you compensate for a fluctuating schedule.

Got tips?
Post 1 • IP   flag post
Member Summerbay private msg quote post Address this user
I work by project so if I don't work during my usual work week, I have to make up the time in the evenings and on weekends. For example, my daughter and I took Wednesday and Thursday off last week for a little getaway, then I worked all weekend. There's not much I can outsource at the moment, but I'm working on leveraging my time to make more money and work fewer hours.
Post 2 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@Summerbay

Interesting ... I sometimes find the odd day (Sunday mornings for example ...) to be productive.
Post 3 • IP   flag post
Student TParker private msg quote post Address this user
Currently, my husband's days off are Friday and Saturday (when he's not called for overtime!) So, Thursday night we prep for my two high production days. Then, I spend two days working, wearing headphones and occasionally uttering the phrases "Where's your daddy? Can't he help you with that?"

I have also been known to sleep while everyone else is awake so that I can have the whole place to myself when they finally tucker out.

Knowing in advance that you will face scheduling challenges helps. You have to have two or three different "modes." Have one routine for normal weeks and another for the chaotic ones. (Though around here, chaos is normal.) Also, add in more margin than you think you'll need.

Of course, I live by the procrastinator's creed. Work gets done best when the deadline is looming and panic sets in.
Post 4 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by TParker
Work gets done best when the deadline is looming and panic sets in.


That's another very old reference.

Okay, not really. But it should be.
Post 5 • IP   flag post
Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
I keep to a tight schedule, but if I want to take time off during the week I have to work weekends.
Post 6 • IP   flag post
Top Contributor Steve private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew Residual income ... that's my secret, it allows me to keep a completely flexible schedule... some weeks I work lots, others I don't.... yet with residual income I get paid.

Everyone should look at ways to add in some residual income, be it some form of proactive marketing plan, Twitter management, maintenance, monthly this or that ... sell it once, and collect long term.
Post 7 • IP   flag post
Member lunar_ranger private msg quote post Address this user
@Steve Would love to learn this from you!
Post 8 • IP   flag post
Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve
Residual income ... that's my secret, it allows me to keep a completely flexible schedule...


Exactly. I earn my entire living from a desktop computer in my home or a laptop when I travel. And some of that comes from work contracted weeks, or months, or even years ago.

Some residual income just keeps coming based on the initial work. Some requires updates to the work on a weekly or monthly or other, often flexible, schedule.

Add regular contract or "pick-up" work to that -- stuff that pays once for the work you do once -- and it makes for a nice income. Depending on the mix at the time you can be very busy or have lots of time to play.

If you are a regular paycheck kind of person, you won't want this. Until you have enough of the residual stuff to smooth out the hills and valleys in the income stream it can be pretty unnerving for average office or assembly line worker.

Be sure you understand what you are getting into. Once past the "smooth" point, though... Nice.

Remember, it isn't the hills in life that will trouble you most. It's the DIPS!


Post 9 • IP   flag post
29148 9 9
Log in or sign up to compose a reply.
destitute