BillBelew.com

Authors, Do you give your books away?2749

Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@RogerBruner Dunno. Good question.
Post 26 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
I am sitting outside a Barnes & Noble in a mall (it's 105 outside!).

Inside there is a woman who put abt 100 books on a desk and sat down behind them.

Book signing.

Do people still do that? I guess so.

Is it worth it? I don't know.

Is it?
Post 27 • IP   flag post
Member gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
I did a ton of book signings and book store readings. It feels good, but I question how much it improves your sales. The people who really benefit are those with well-known followers and names. Then people are lined up to see the author.
Post 28 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@gspieler

Thanks for the honest perspective. I have done a lot of things (speaking) that felt good but in the end was just money and time spent on my end without the return I had hoped for.
Post 29 • IP   flag post
Member gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
Yeah. I loved the spotlight until only three people sat down to hear me. And they were already in the bookstore and saw a bit of entertainment.

One bookstore that was local (Bay Area) had me in and said they had a mailing address of thousands of customers they mail to. I thought, "Cool, I'll have a packed room." Nope. I learned from much wiser authors that if you have a local reading, put out your own campaign to friends and family. Much like a radio interview. Salt the audience.
Post 30 • IP   flag post


Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
I have a hard-earned list of 35000+. I really do.

I could offer to tell all of them about you ... for a price, of course. <snicker> ...

But if they don't know you and they don't get the connection between how they know you and how I know you and why they should care ... chances are there will be 3 people there....if that.
Post 31 • IP   flag post
Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
The best approach is what Capt Jack does. Give a presentation first to win the hearts and minds, and then they'll flock to buy a signed book.
Post 32 • IP   flag post
Member gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
People need to feel invested in some way to take the time to go to a book reading, for whatever reasons. And now since bookstores have gotten smart, you don't get to see the author reading unless you buy the book as your ticket to entry.

So, when I write that best seller I'll finally have an audience.
Post 33 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Lets do the math.

How many hours does it take to write a book?
How many hours does it take to get an agent?
How many hours does it take to get a publisher?
How many hours goes into the author marketing the book?
How many hours are spent on a plane, in a car, signing books, wishing on a star? (couldn't resist.)

We'll call this X. Creative, eh?


How much money do you get from your book sales? Your advance?
Subtract amount paid for the books you carried to the book store, to the conference, to the trunk of you car.

We'll call this Y.

Now let's divide X by Y. How much did you make per hour?
Post 34 • IP   flag post
Member gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
So far? Bubkas.
Post 35 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@gspieler

I hope you understand this was meant as a general question ... not pointed at you. 8-)
Post 36 • IP   flag post
Member gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
Oh, I know. It is a very good question. Some folks don't understand that it can be very expensive to write a book, not including the hours it takes to do all you mention above.

I entered several book contests to hopefully rack up some awards to market with.

At one of such events, while I won first prize in nonfiction, I was chatting with a man who won in fiction. He remarked that the meager funds we got from the contest didn't come close to making up for what he spent writing his book. It was the first time I heard someone else acknowledge that.

It costs me a ton of research associated fees: travel, copies, signing up for people search sites, all kinds of stuff. Unless or until the movie gets made and I get my "big" check, I'm way into the red for that book.
Post 37 • IP   flag post
Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
But surely "the book" is only the beginning of the journey.

"The book" is one marketing tool, but a very powerful one when it comes to establishing us as top influencers.

No one makes any money from writing a book, but it is an important part of a process that shouldn't be shunned.
Post 38 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Another honest and deeper insight into the author's life. Thanks!

I forgot to mention editing costs and research costs that lead up to writing the book.
Post 39 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@SusanDay

I think you are on to something.

A book is not the end game or the money maker (sometimes it is), but a calling card to open up the doors to other opportunities.
Post 40 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by SusanDay
the beginning of the journey.


For too many, the book is the end game.

Once they are done writing, they expect heaps of praise and opportunities to come their way.

How's that working for them I wonder.
Post 41 • IP   flag post
Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew Absolutely, "the book" is like a rather large, over-sized business card.

It says, "This is me. Look, at what I know..."
Post 42 • IP   flag post
Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew You're in a great position to do author tours if your book. Have you considered that option?
Post 43 • IP   flag post
Member gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew @SusanDay I learned early on from a fairly "well published" author that for most people, there is no money from a book.

I'm guessing there is some credibility in having been published. Still not rich, though.

And, yes, forgot about hiring editors--really good editors--to help my very poor writing skills.
Post 44 • IP   flag post
Student jmolan private msg quote post Address this user
As far as getting paid to write, my former working life, we used to joke "some days I'd do this for free, and some days you could't pay me enough to do this"

I'm learning being an "author" suddenly adds a line to your title, and make you an expert. Speaking gigs pay well in the Corp. world if you can tap into those. I've been contacted by a big shot liability attorney from boat injury expert witness gigs. Like Susan said, it's a big business card.
Post 45 • IP   flag post
Member gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
@jmolan; Interesting point. I get paid for my freelance writing and maybe having published a book helps. But it seems what people really want to know is that I've published articles that they find relevant to their topics. However, being an expert? Well, not in my line of work.
Post 46 • IP   flag post
Student jmolan private msg quote post Address this user
hahaha, yea, I tell people I will open it up for questions, but I warn you, if I don't know the answer, I'll make it up. They laugh but I think they know I'm only half kidding.
Post 47 • IP   flag post
29622 47 22
Log in or sign up to compose a reply.
destitute