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Imsanity Wordpress plugin2808

Member tienny private msg quote post Address this user
I happen to stumble upon Imsanity wordpress plugin.

It automatically resizes huge image uploads down to a size that is more reasonable for display in browser, yet still more than large enough for typical website use.
The plugin is configurable with a max width, height and quality. When a contributor uploads an
image that is larger than the configured size, Imsanity will automatically scale it down to the
configured size and replace the original image.

@belew @Rev @Steve @DansCartoon What do you all think about this plugin?
Post 1 • IP   flag post
Member llanik private msg quote post Address this user
Love it thanks will check it out when I create my website. Awesome!
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Member DansCartoons private msg quote post Address this user
I didn't examine it in the plugin respository, but if he updates it, that is a good thing. I personally, haven't dealt with many huge files all at once because I like to work specifically image by image when editing....then if I store them and actually have to send them somewhere, use a file compression software.

Looks good if you're continually uploading alot
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Top Contributor Steve private msg quote post Address this user
I use a image optimisation plugin... that optimises all my images... i have it on a monthly subscription plan... that i and my clients use.

Similar to this one i imagine.
Post 4 • IP   flag post
Member tienny private msg quote post Address this user
@steve Do you mind to share which plugins do you use?

@DansCartoon Thanks for your response. Even I prefer to edit the image one by one.
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Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@tienny

Good image compression plugins are a real help. They reduce file size which improves load time and reduces data storage requirements. Many people don't consider the impact of large files and many of those who otherwise would have no idea how to resize and compress their images anyway.

A good image compression plugin resizes and compresses images automatically when they are first uploaded. Many also have a feature to process existing images when the plugin is first installed.

I have used both Imsanity and Ewwww, both good examples of this type of plugin. I am currently evaluating WP Compress, an new player in the field.

https://wpcompress.com/beta/
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Member tienny private msg quote post Address this user
@Rev Which one do you think is better?
Post 7 • IP   flag post
Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@tienny

They are about the same. Just pick one.

It's good to know more than one good choice in case there is a plugin conflict.

You should also note that well made plugins only load when needed, use code libraries already called by WordPress core, and don't really put that much load on your website. People seem to worry too much about too many plugins. WordPress is designed to use plugins. Plugins are the same kind of code that would be hard-coded into a custom website and called as functions. A bigger issue for slow performance is cheap over-loaded hosting.

Too many plugins isn't the problem.

Too many amateur website consultants is!
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Member tienny private msg quote post Address this user
@rev How to discern which plugin is well-made?
Post 9 • IP   flag post
Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@tienny

Quote:
Originally Posted by tienny
How to discern which plugin is well-made?


That's a tough one. If you're not a programmer (and one skilled in plugin creation at that) you can't really check the code. You could hire that done but it gets pretty expensive.

Purchasing premium plugins instead of using free ones is often suggested as a way to get better quality plugins. That also isn't a good plan. There are probably just as many premium plugins that can give problems as there are free ones in the same category. Price is not an indicator of quality.

Picking plugins that have been recently updated is another thing may suggest. That only tells you that the plugin is currently supported, not how well that support is, nor how good the programmer is with his code.

There are many perfectly fine plugins that haven't been updated for months (or even years) simply because they don't have to be. They don't have any security or other coding issues and they don't interact with any part of core that has been changed. They are still perfectly fine as they are.

Generally, there is no easy-to-apply metric that will guarantee a good plugin vs. a bad one. None of the things I've mentioned above nor any of a half-dozen others can assure you a plugin is good, nor does the opposite mean it is bad.

In my experience one of the only quality indicators that suggests a plugin really is good is the installed base. If a lot of people currently use a plugin it is probably working well and not conflicting with other good plugins.

And, you can always ask.
Post 10 • IP   flag post
Member tienny private msg quote post Address this user
@Rev Even though I am a programmer before, I know certain languages.

Thanks to know that Ivan always ask.
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