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Using a Publishing Company2814

Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
So, the big day has come and I've hit 'publish' on my first non-fiction book, The Top 10 Things Happy Grandparents Never Regret Doing!

I have decided to use a UK based publishing company who I write reviews for. I like their style and they weren't too expensive.

Has anyone go any advice or ideas? I'd love to hear about your own experiences
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Member Summerbay private msg quote post Address this user
Congratulations, Susan!

Wendy
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Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
Thanks Wendy!
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Member gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
Wow. What a great book. I'm ordering. You have a winner here.

Advice? Not sure how to market a Kindle exclusively? Are you not doing a paperback?

I'm guessing you have found your target market, which is folks like me. You grabbed my interest right away with the title. I pitched to reading groups who were mostly women.

Senior communities? Lots of them popping all over the place with Baby Boomers "coming of age."
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Member Kenneth6317 private msg quote post Address this user
Are you using a traditional publisher or a supporting publisher? In other words, are you paying to have your work readied to publish or is your publisher looking after the costs? Look at your contract for what rights they're claiming in either purchase or lease and for what time terms. What promotions, marketing and distribution they'll do. What vendors they'll distribute too, etc. Be certain your manuscript is well edited before it reaches the proof editor. There are so many items to tend to even with traditional publishers. Remember, books are judged by their covers and reviews.
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Member gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
I just ordered your book. I see it in Kindle only. @Kenneth6317 has really good advice re the publisher and your rights. Hang on to them.
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Member Kenneth6317 private msg quote post Address this user
Interesting. may I ask which book? I have six out.
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Member Kenneth6317 private msg quote post Address this user
one was published by another publisher and I'm disappointed with the work they did, 5 I did as I was learning.
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Member Kenneth6317 private msg quote post Address this user
By the way, my apology for not say so quicker, but thank you.
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Member julesthoughts private msg quote post Address this user
Congratulations!

Are they a vanity or a hybrid publishing house? Both are ones you pay but there are advantages to the hybrids.
Nevermind my questions. I'm assuming now you went straight to an ebook.
Marketing the ebook will be similar to marketing a paper copy and most of it will fall on you. Not sure if Kirkus gives reviews for ebooks but I recommend them if it does. You've already got a writing platform so use it to push this work and email everyone telling them how to get this piece. I myself found writing/revising/rewrites/editing the easy part of creating a manuscript. The marketing to me is harder but I think you'll do very well at it. Good Luck on the sales.
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Member Kenneth6317 private msg quote post Address this user
@julesthoughts I find the platform building the second easier part the prepping the manuscript with writing it easiest. The marketing and promotion the hardest with distribution to vendors the third most difficult.
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Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
@gspieler thanks for your kind words. Yes, you are my target market - smart grandmas with a passion for creating a positive relationship with their grandkids.

I'm just publishing the paperback today, which is exciting.

I'd love to hear your feedback.
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Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
@Kenneth6317 Thanks for your tips.

I have self published 15 times or more in the past seven years. I am using only the promotional side because there ars too many pitfalls, as you said, with vanity publishers.

And yes it has been well edited and the cover was tested to appeal to my target market.
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Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
@julesthoughts Oh you are so right! Marketing and promoting is the hardest part. This is not my first book so I'm aware of what's ahead. I guess that's why I chose to pay to get a better reach beyond the "tribe" I have been working with.

I will check out Kirkus and let you know what happens.

Wish me luck!
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Member gspieler private msg quote post Address this user
@julesthoughts Yes, you are so right about the writing/editing process compared to the marketing part. I didn't understand that when writer friends said, "well now the hard work begins after you publish your book."

You're not new to this, but I'm going to share my thoughts anyway, for what they are worth:

Trying to get visibility is very, very difficult. I had a commercial publisher that did a lot for me, but I still worked very hard as well. I found getting in front of people the most successful. I hit up all my local radio stations, TV and weekly newspaper using my "local author" as my lead. It worked well. Then I hit up all the local social and charity clubs like the Lions, Elks, etc., Women's groups, libraries and book groups. It was the face-to-face that worked best. Bookstores are another venue once you have your hard copy if they carry your book. Also, affinity groups, like if there is a "Grandma" website or Facebook page.

Re-reviews, Goodreads, Kirkus, New York Journal of Books, other online review places.
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Teacher SusanDay private msg quote post Address this user
@gspieler Great tips! I have most of these, but it's so good to know I'm on the right track.
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