BillBelew.com
Video Production

Script, Concept and Pitches for Video726

tienny private msg quote post Address this user
Oh, I get so confused in writing for the commercial video script and pitches. When I google it, all sort of stuff come out. Is it different from the animation script that I write and did?
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jycmba private msg quote post Address this user
Sometimes certain niches have their specific ways of doing things.. but I wouldn't worry about it to the extent that it keeps you from simply getting done what you need to do.

In other words, if a particular agency / company needs a certain format, they can either provide a sample or better yet have someone who can walk you through what they need.

On set there's even more rituals like pink sheets, call sheets, etc.. again, they'll only yell at you if they really feel you should know it. But here's another case where ignorance can be blissfully safe. Just give the Ensign (most junior officer on a ship) salute! [shrug]
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tienny private msg quote post Address this user
@jycmba Thanks.
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@tienny

Create something that you would watch.
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jycmba private msg quote post Address this user
It's possible to create something for which you're not the target audience - a great example, of course, is my friend Bea who's a children's author but clearly not a kid.

Still, there's something to what @Belew says - it's a lot harder to create something you don't enjoy yourself.. the whole "eat your own food" idea.
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@jycmba

You are absolutely right!

I long ago figured that I am NOT my target audience.

I often find myself speaking to groups who are NOT me.

But if I don't like what I am saying/creating I simply don't want to show it to other people, nor can I expect them to like it.
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jycmba private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew - a storyteller is a teacher who leads without telling the audience where to go.

They simply invite them on a journey.

If it's done skillfully, the audience doesn't even know what happened, except that they feel better for having gone along.
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@jycmba

Funny you mentioned storytelling.

@StellaT (my excellent VA) and I are working on an eBook and infographic on "Doing Storytelling Right." Title will likely change.
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Came across this yesterday -

4 Ways to Use Video

Homepage Explainer Video
Customized Landing-page Video
Videos in Your Content Marketing
Videos in Your Emails
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jycmba private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew - Save the Cat is a great template for storytelling.. it captures the essence of the 13 key structures that have worked over and over again.

The skill comes in using one of these, and the audience not going "come on, that's just a ripoff of Romeo & Juliet."

A good recent example was Fury - the tank movie with Brad Pitt. No one, as far as I know, noticed the references to Moby Dick.
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@jycmba

Never heard of the Save the Cat template... but I am keen to learn.
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jycmba private msg quote post Address this user
Here's the link Save the Cat
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Pixar's 22 rules of Good Storytelling

#1: You admire a character for trying more than for their successes.

#2: You gotta keep in mind what’s interesting to you as an audience, not what’s fun to do as a writer. They can be v. different.

#3: Trying for theme is important, but you won’t see what the story is actually about til you’re at the end of it. Now rewrite.

#4: Once upon a time there was ___. Every day, ___. One day ___. Because of that, ___. Because of that, ___. Until finally ___.

#5: Simplify. Focus. Combine characters. Hop over detours. You’ll feel like you’re losing valuable stuff but it sets you free.

#6: What is your character good at, comfortable with? Throw the polar opposite at them. Challenge them. How do they deal?

#7: Come up with your ending before you figure out your middle. Seriously. Endings are hard, get yours working up front.

#8: Finish your story, let go even if it’s not perfect. In an ideal world you have both, but move on. Do better next time.

#9: When you’re stuck, make a list of what WOULDN’T happen next. Lots of times the material to get you unstuck will show up.

#10: Pull apart the stories you like. What you like in them is a part of you; you’ve got to recognize it before you can use it.

#11: Putting it on paper lets you start fixing it. If it stays in your head, a perfect idea, you’ll never share it with anyone.

#12: Discount the 1st thing that comes to mind. And the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th – get the obvious out of the way. Surprise yourself.

#13: Give your characters opinions. Passive/malleable might seem likable to you as you write, but it’s poison to the audience.

#14: Why must you tell THIS story? What’s the belief burning within you that your story feeds off of? That’s the heart of it.

#15: If you were your character, in this situation, how would you feel? Honesty lends credibility to unbelievable situations.

#16: What are the stakes? Give us reason to root for the character. What happens if they don’t succeed? Stack the odds against.

#17: No work is ever wasted. If it’s not working, let go and move on – it’ll come back around to be useful later.

#18: You have to know yourself: the difference between doing your best & fussing. Story is testing, not refining.

#19: Coincidences to get characters into trouble are great; coincidences to get them out of it are cheating.

#20: Exercise: take the building blocks of a movie you dislike. How d’you rearrange them into what you DO like?

#21: You gotta identify with your situation/characters, can’t just write ‘cool’. What would make YOU act that way?

#22: What’s the essence of your story? Most economical telling of it? If you know that, you can build out from there.
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jycmba private msg quote post Address this user
Overlapping ideas - Save the Cat is more concerned with structure and hitting key points.

The two definitely go hand in hand.
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morrnel private msg quote post Address this user
I've read about the hero's journey that has been used in stories since Moses. How would you say this ties in?
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@morrnel

In every instance of Content Marketing, the site owner becomes the "hero" of the searcher's query.

Gosh, Moses, um, Morris has solved my problem for me = knows the solution. He's my hero. I'd like to contact him.
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jycmba private msg quote post Address this user
@morrnel - the key is for the audience to identify with the hero though.. that's the main point of Save the Cat.

That's why even superheroes are more effective if they have human weaknesses.

@Belew connects w/ his audience because he doesn't talk like an academic, even if he's teaching in that environment.
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