BillBelew.com
Business AdviceCareer AdviceLinkedIn

Helping Others Benefit from Social Proof885

Member jycmba private msg quote post Address this user
Even as a student pilot we knew the power of the "Halo effect." That is, once a top instructor gave you an "above average" grade for your flight, you knew you were golden. The other instructors tended to give you the benefit of the doubt - before you stepped in the cockpit.

Today the power of social proof in social media is stronger than ever. Sure, we love it when we get 'Likes' on Facebook. Or finding the Yelp recommendations for a restaurant.


But how many of us actively seek out or better yet GIVE Endorsements and/or testimonials on LinkedIn?

Sometimes I think it's the little details that get in the way, so I made a short video on how to GIVE your recommendation in a few minutes -



Besides helping your contacts out, we often feel obliged to reciprocate the favor. So, now together you have TWO recommendations to help others find quality contacts!

Who can you help by endorsing today?
Post 1 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@jycmba

Question...

What happens when someone recommends you but you don't feel like you can recommend them?

Or you have delivered a service to a client and they thank you with a recommendation but you don't know about the quality of their work?

How would you handle that?
Post 2 • IP   flag post
Member jycmba private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew - that's a tough one, of course. I think that idea of "if you can't say something nice.." applies. Generally, people won't pressure you and back off.

If someone almost demands a recommendation, that's probably not someone you want to maintain a relationship with anyways.

I think the 2nd case you bring up is whether I would recommend work I don't know. Me personally? Of course not. At the same time marketers often have to help businesses sell things that you don't fully know.

The first thing to do, of course, would be getting as familiar as you can.

But, say, you're working with an optometrist, and you've never worn glasses. Do some research and talk about your observations..

"Dr. Lee is one of the most respected members of our community. He is considered by many to be the "go to" physician in his field.."
Post 3 • IP   flag post
Member jycmba private msg quote post Address this user
..in case you need to ASK for an endorsement or testimonial..

Post 4 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@jycmba

What I try to do is ask the person who wants to be recommended to write their version of what they want me to say. I can then tweak it as necessary to make it sound like it came from me.

We did this in the military. We always wrote our own evaluations and passed them up the chain of command. The evals didn't look the same when they came back down but we were able to point out things to our COs that might not have been noticed or mentioned otherwise.
Post 5 • IP   flag post
Member lunar_ranger private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew I like the bottom-up PVAL approach as well. If it is a 1-1 relationship I would nudge but not pressure to receive them and if I were to be asked to recommend them, I would measure my existing relationship with them vs. the type of relationship I would want to have them in the future... ie: don't recommend someone just to get them off your back.
Post 6 • IP   flag post
Member jycmba private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew - I always felt funny writing about myself.. well, it seemed like bragging, which in the Eastern cultures is considered a no-no, of course.

Guess sometimes our attitude is "shouldn't they already know what a great person I am?"

Typically, I'm more comfortable gushing about friends or colleagues to other people.

Over time I've adopted the mindset that sharing accomplishments isn't boasting, if it's not so obvious and can possibly help someone.
Post 7 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@jycmba

this might go in the favorite quote thread.

"If you can do it, it ain't bragging." Will Rogers.

Just tell them what you can or have done. People will think what they will think.
Post 8 • IP   flag post
Member lunar_ranger private msg quote post Address this user
@jycmba You're not boasting your toasting your success and sharing the Kool-aid. OK, Western attitudes could use a dose of humility and self-boasting is a great way to put off someone. Build trust, show them that you put their success and growth first and you're not polishing your trophies or ego in front of them. Get someone else to write about you. Accept your humanness and lend them your strength and experience.
Post 9 • IP   flag post
Member tienny private msg quote post Address this user
I do not know how to talk about myself. But I like to talk about my creative work.
Post 10 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@tienny

Let your work do the talking about yourself. It is enough.
Post 11 • IP   flag post
Member tienny private msg quote post Address this user
@belew Thanks
Post 12 • IP   flag post
Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
I get the whole social proof thing.

but i also know that just because something is popular doesn't mean it is also good.

How do you distinguish between the masses are recognizing something as great and the crowd is riding the wave of a fad?
Post 13 • IP   flag post
29378 13 13
destitute