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Evergreen Web Topics890

lunar_ranger private msg quote post Address this user
Evergreen content stays fresh, relevant, and has a timeless appeal. Where do you find the greatest need for this sort of content within on-line marketing? What topics aren't discussed that should be? Who has the greatest need for this information? Why?
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@lunar_ranger There you go again... 4 questions in one thread.

These questions could take a long time to answer.

Everybody who is serious about being found online needs evergreen content.

I don't know that it all has to be original either. Of course, I don't mean cut and paste.

Example -

I live in Silicon Valley. My clients live in Silicon Valley. (Some of them do.)

It would do me and my credibility well to write something about the history of Silicon Valley on my web site or speak to it in my presentations or both.

History is history and there's not much I can say that most likely hasn't been said already. But my clients haven't heard me say it = that's why I need to give my take on the history and how it might affect my clients. When I do this, it offers up tangible proof that I have done my background work, too.

Too often web site owners just want to point to information. What they need to do is read it, digest it, comment on it and speak to the relevance of the information as it applies to how they do their work and how that will affect the people they work for. And put that information on their site, too!

Evergreen content, in one form anyway, is doing and showing due diligence on topics that affect you and your clients.

Not enough people do the hard work of grinding out the content and publishing it to prove that they should be listened to = have credibility.

Not sure I was able to make the point here ... if not, I'll try again.
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Ericka private msg quote post Address this user
I blog on the topic of personal development, as do many bloggers. I think that writing from my perspective and experience is what makes the difference though.
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@Ericka

Indeed! Your readers want to know what you think!

I agree. I disagree. I have a slightly different take.

I am me and here's why.

Now, how can I help you be you?
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Ericka private msg quote post Address this user
Well put in YOUR way :-) I see it being no different than newspapers. Same stories... Different spin.
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Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@belew

For you history narrative... back in the early days of Silicon Valley, before Google, before the Internet, even before Apple, electronic security was an emerging industry. Everybody was scrambling to make their mark with some new concept in burglar detection and theft prevention. New patents and start ups were occurring at a furious pace.

An acquaintance of mine was there with his great new idea, ready to begin production and get it to market. He just needed a company name he could brand and associate with the product. The current rage was to use some variation/combination of industry keywords like Security and Electronics giving you SecuTron or the like.

Remember, this was pre-Internet and you couldn't just plug a name into a search box and click up the results in three seconds. You had to fill in the paper search form and submit it at the registry office with your $3 filing fee and then wait... and wait... and two to four days later you were told, "Sorry, that name is already taken."

My friend did this about a dozen times and was getting pretty discouraged. He'd tried names like AlarmTec, CompuSec, SecuriTron, Secutronics, Alarmtronics, and several others, all with the same negative reply. He was ready to give up when a new idea struck him. He filed for the new name and it was approved.

His company, SOLFAN, was an early winner in a region that later became populated with names like Yahoo and Google, short, catchy, names that, though often nonsensical, were immediately memorable. His company name, though, had a more personal touch.

It was derived from the phrase, Sick Of Looking For A Name!
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@Rev

great story. I'll stick it in.
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Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@lunar_ranger

what are your evergreen topics?
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