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How Do You Deal with Seasons at Work?936

Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
Do you have ebbs and flows in your work schedule and pace?

Do you have busy seasons? Sustained down times?

It's easy for me to be busy, not so easy to take a break.

How do you deal with big picture flow of your work?

How do you plan for a long time away when if you don't do the work, nothing gets done?
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Member lunar_ranger private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew I have always been a great, tips-of-toes tactical thinker. I suck with far off dead-lines and project end dates- you can only prepare so far ahead- and I love the adrenaline fueled crunch-time ride of a near deadline. Why? Distractions. When something is far off, its not top of mind, it gets relegated to "remember to schedule your annual physical, level priority" (which is always LOW priority.)The only way to keep me sane is to create other related short-term goals that can keep me interested, excited, engaged, and in-line with the BIG PICTURE thing I am going after. If the big picture isn't clearly defined it's like hunting for Easter eggs in July.
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Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
Wow, that's involved. The natural seasons are a joy. My desk faces a window about 30° to my right. I enjoy the seasonal change, the variety of birds it brings, the foliage or lack thereof -- it's kind of like a slow motion time machine.

As for business seasons, my work is fairly level. I have enough of my own (websites, writing, etc.) to fill in any gaps with client work. Trips include the laptop. My business is 100% portable. I can run it from anywhere I choose to be as long as there is WiFi.
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Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@lunar_ranger

I can do short term. But that crunch irritates me more now than before.

I have learned that the times I get the most angry is when I am in a hurry. And I don't like being angry.

I was the guy who got his term paper done in the 2nd or 3rd week of 1 3 - week course and then tweaked it till the deadline.

I can handle crunches just fine. I just don't like them.

I have major speaking events a month out and 4 months out and so on. I enjoy planning for them.

I also do mini events weekly.

What I don't do well is plan for down time.

If I don't work it doesn't get done. But taking time off is essential too. I don't know how to take time off.
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Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@Rev

Are you able to step away from your work completely?

Can you leave your laptop turned off for a week, 2 weeks at a time?
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Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
A lounge chair or a hammock on the beach, or by a cabin in the woods, or on a yacht or cruise ship (whatever your poison), with a laptop, isn't "down time", it's "change time", and that is, they say, as good as a rest.
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Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew

Why would I want to? Is it important?

I don't need to have the laptop turned on every minute, nor do I need to be glued to it. I don't carry (I don't own) a cell phone and I've never understood that compulsion. I can break, have fun, explore new things, but I can keep my business going smoothly because I choose to do so.

The key, I think, is getting to your "comfort level" without actually falling into the trap of getting comfortable.
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Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@Rev I like change time. I like working from different places. I have a very light weight external monitor that I have taken to lugging around.

or I can just use my laptop.

I can't, however, find the off switch.
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Forum Owner Belew private msg quote post Address this user
@Rev

I can do all those things except ...the break. ...

I am getting to the point now where before long I will be able to say, "Nope. I never did figure out how to do that."
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Member lunar_ranger private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew I guess with a certain level detachment you can gain perspective. As for managing down-time? My work routine has always been established by other people and has always been fast pitch. Since I am doing more and more work off-line with less definitive deadlines... I am struggling a bit with that.

@Rev I have more respect for you man... I envy the fact that you can keep that "standby mode" in operation- you can get comfortable while switching off. I am hopelessly addicted to my smartphone, my in-box, and my calendar.
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Member lunar_ranger private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew... topic- Managing Your Time On-line: A Thought-leadership Perspective on Switching On Your Audience and Knowing When to Switch Yourself Off.

Inspiration comes through stillness sometimes.
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Teacher Rev private msg quote post Address this user
@Belew

Somethings just don't have an off switch. The sun, for example, thankfully. So don't fret about it. Adapt to it -- you surely have by now -- and don't let other people's routines bug you. As we used to say, "Do your own thing, man!"

@lunar_ranger

Thank you. I have found my place and I live it. It works for me. Not for everyone though.

"From each according to his ability, to each according to his need."

Louis Blanc knew what he was saying. And while it was appropriated by Karl Marx, and thus has fallen from favor in the west, it is a far deeper, far more applicable concept for the individual than any broad political doctrine or economic system that tries to usurp it. As ancient as Ying-Yang, as modern as "give and take", it is the true foundation of reciprocity.
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